When Should You Be Screened For Colon Cancer

When Should You Be Screened For Colon Cancer

When Should You Be Screened For Colon Cancer – Congratulations! Colon Cancer Screening Rate in Kentucky Hits 70%! This is a really wonderful achievement, but a lot more work needs to be done. Our goal is to reach 80% statewide in 2018 and ensure that no county falls below 70%.

There are a few other small things YOU can do to prevent or catch colon cancer early. But first, do you know what we mean when we say on time? American Cancer Society guidelines were changed this year to recommend screening at ages 45 and 50. Because we are seeing patients with colon cancer in their 30s and 40s, we need to start the conversation much sooner and implement lifestyle changes even earlier. The incidence of colon cancer is increasing among adults. People born after 1990 are twice as likely to develop colon cancer and four times more likely than people born in 1950.

When Should You Be Screened For Colon Cancer

By age 40, but preferably earlier, both patients and providers should participate in an initial discussion about individualized colon cancer prevention and early detection. This intervention should include four parts:

Preventing Colon Cancer In Appalachia

1. Review family history of colon cancer, adenomas, other cancers, or conditions that may require colon cancer screening before age 45.

3. Importance of early screening for normal risk individuals starting at age 45 and discussion of screening options.

4. Discuss evidence-based lifestyle changes to reduce the risk of colon cancer, including weight loss, smoking cessation, increased exercise, and dietary changes.

Much has been done in Kentucky, but we can do better. YOU are an integral part of this puzzle! YOU can prevent colon cancer yourself and encourage your loved ones to do the same! Help us raise screening rates to at least 80% to end preventable death and suffering from colon cancer. Bowel cancer is a very serious disease that affects around 41,000 people in the UK every year and is the second biggest killer in the UK.

Reasons Why You Should Get Screened For Cancer

The risk of colon cancer, also known as colon cancer, is influenced by a number of factors. Understanding these colon cancer risk factors can help you make lifestyle changes and become more aware of your condition. Just because you have a risk factor doesn’t necessarily mean you will develop colon cancer.

A diet high in red and processed meat has been found to increase the risk of colon cancer, while diets high in fruit, vegetables, whole grains and fiber have been shown to reduce the risk. Cancer Research UK in 2010 stated that around 21% of all bowel cancers are linked to consumption of red and processed meat.

13% of colon cancer is associated with obesity (with BMI above 40) and there seems to be a stronger link between obesity and colon cancer in men. Long-term smokers also have a lower risk of colon/colon cancer than non-smokers, and heavy alcohol consumption is also known to increase the risk.

A strong family history of colon cancer, that is, several relatives suffering from the disease, can double the risk of developing the disease compared to the average risk (25%). Colon cancer caused by genetic defects can cause colon cancer to occur at a younger age than usual.

Women Who Screen For Colorectal Cancer At 45 Reduce Risk By 60%

Certain racial groups are known to have higher colon cancer incidence and mortality rates. Ashkenazi Jews have several genetic mutations that cause one of the highest risks of colon cancer among ethnic groups. African Americans also show a higher risk, although the reason for this is not yet known.

Other medical conditions – Other diseases that often involve the colon, such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease, increase the risk of colon cancer.

The same symptoms can also indicate other, less serious conditions, such as hemorrhoids (piles), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), diverticular disease, infection, or inflammatory bowel disease (ulcerative colitis/Crohn’s disease). However, if you have any of the symptoms of colon cancer listed below, you should immediately consult a doctor to confirm further diagnosis.

As the disease progresses, there may be other colon cancer symptoms to look out for. Bleeding can occur in the intestine, but not in the intestine, leading to anemia. This can cause:

The Best Colon Cancer Screening Test Is The One That Gets Done

Colon cancer screening can help detect cancer in its early stages and treat you early. Screening can also detect non-cancerous lesions (polyps) that can later turn into cancer, allowing them to be removed and thus prevent the development of colon cancer.

There is an NHS bowel cancer screening program in the UK, but it is only available to people over 60 (50 or over in Scotland). Since bowel cancer rates increase from the age of 45, it is possible to be tested privately with BowelCheck from this age.

Unlike the NHS bowel cancer screening programme, BowelCheck is available to anyone over the age of 45 and the testing mechanism is more advanced, leading to more accurate results. No colon cancer screening test is guaranteed to be 100% accurate, and a positive BowelCheck result means that further investigations are recommended.

Colon cancer prognosis can be very good if it is detected in the early stages, which is why colon cancer screenings like BowelCheck are so important.

The Fit Test Measures Up For Noninvasive Colon Cancer Screening

If you are concerned about bowel cancer, BowelCheck has developed a simple test kit that you can use in the comfort of your own home.

Early tests for bowel cancer actually detect the presence of blood in a stool (poo) sample. This is known as a fecal occult blood test, which involves sending a sample of poo to a lab for testing. If blood is detected, further investigations are needed and may include a colonoscopy (examination of the entire colon using a flexible camera), a flexible sigmoidoscopy (a camera examination of the lower part of the intestine), or a virtual colonoscopy. (CT scan).

How doctors treat colon cancer depends on the stage of the disease at diagnosis. Surgery is usually required to remove the affected part of the intestine. If the disease is more advanced, you may also need chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy, and new treatment approaches are looking at treatments that reduce the risk of it coming back.

BowelCheck is a qFIT colon cancer screening test that looks for signs of undigested human blood in your stool, as this could be a sign of colon cancer. BowelCheck can be done in the comfort of your own home and is quick, hygienic and easy to use. Get a colon cancer screening.

Your Parent Had Colon Cancer? Why Is It Important For You To Screen Periodically?

Our Providers Arifa Khan, MD Ashley Bunight, APRN Baolong Nguyen, MD Carl A. Raczkowski, MD David A. Neumann II, MD David S. Stokesberry, MD Kenneth Seres, MD Maria C. Chang, MD. Dean, APRN-CNP Neil Crittenden, MD Ross S. Kiner, MD Pramoda Koduru, MD Salman Nusrat, MD Sikandar A. Messiah, Son H. MD. Nguyen, Sumit A. MD. Walia, MD Syed Rizvisha, MD. APRN, FNP-C, CGRN Veerapan Wongtavarawat, MD Zach Smith, MD.

Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Screening at age 45 prevents colon cancer. If you have a family history or any other signs or symptoms, you should have this screening every ten years starting at age 45. There are several tests for colon cancer screening. Tests include FOBT, flexible sigmoidoscopy, and colonoscopy screening. When you find one or more symptoms, you should consult a doctor. Genetic syndrome, family history, inflammatory bowel disease, Crohn’s disease are reasons why you should go for screening.

**Disclaimer: This blog content does not represent medical advice and does not create a relationship between any patient and care provider. Colon Cancer Screening Colon Cancer Screening Colon Cancer Screening Colonoscopy Upper Endoscopy (EGD) Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) Flexible Sigmoidoscopy

Our Providers Arifa Khan, MD Ashley Bunight, APRN Baolong Nguyen, MD Carl A. Raczkowski, MD David A. Neumann II, MD David S. Stokesberry, MD Kenneth Seres, MD Maria C. Chang, MD. Dean, APRN-CNP Neil Crittenden, MD Ross S. Kiner, MD Pramoda Koduru, MD Salman Nusrat, MD Sikandar A. Messiah, Son H. MD. Nguyen, Sumit A. MD. Walia, MD Syed Rizvisha, MD. APRN, FNP-C, CGRN Verapan Wongtavarawat, MD Zach Smith, MD

What’s The Difference? Colonoscopy Vs. Prostate Exam

Colorectal risk factors can be diet, lifestyle, or even your heritage. People with Lynch syndrome have an increased risk of colon cancer. Also, people who suffer from FAP (familial adenomatous polyposis) can develop colon cancer before the age of 40. In addition, precancerous colon polyps, inflammatory bowel disease, and age are risk factors for colon cancer. Other issues may include physical activity, smoking, and alcohol consumption. Colon cancer symptoms include blood in the stool, anemia, changes in bowel movements, rectal discomfort, and abdominal pain. Feeling this means you should see a colonoscopy specialist right away.

**Disclaimer: This blog content does not represent medical advice and does not create a relationship between any patient and care provider. March is Colon

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