Opinions On Online Classes
Opinions On Online Classes

Opinions On Online Classes

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Goolsby Elementary School third-grader Ava Dweck, 9, takes an online class at a friend’s house during the first week of remote education for the Clark County School District amid the spread of the coronavirus. (Ethan Miller/Getty Images)

Opinions On Online Classes

The Pew Research Center conducted this study to understand how parents of children in K-12 schools in the United States are assessing the impact of the coronavirus outbreak on their children’s education amid changes to instruction this fall. The study also explores concerns among parents of K-12 students and younger children in light of the pandemic. This analysis is based on 2,561 US parents. of children under 18 living in their household. The data were collected as part of a larger survey conducted October 13-19, 2020. All participants are members of the Center’s American Trends Panel (ATP), an online survey panel recruited through a national, random sampling of residential addresses. That way, nearly all US adults have an opportunity to choose. The survey is weighted to be representative of the US adult population. by gender, race, ethnicity, party affiliation, education and other categories. Read more about ATP’s methodology.

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“Parent” is defined here as the parent or guardian of a child under the age of 18 living in the household.

“Median income” is defined here as two-thirds to double the median annual household income for participants in the American Trends Panel. “Lower income” falls below this range. “Higher income” falls above that. See the methodology for more details.

As school districts across the United States continue to grapple with how best to deliver instruction amid the coronavirus outbreak, most parents of students in K-12 schools are concerned that their children are falling behind in school due to the disruptions caused. from the pandemic. There are wide differences between parents whose children attend school entirely in person and those whose children engage in online learning in terms of their evaluations and concerns about the education their children are currently receiving, according to a new Pew Research Center. overview.

Parents of K-12 students who receive only in-person education are more likely to say they are very satisfied with how their children’s school is handling instruction amid the pandemic: 54 percent say so, compared to 30 % of those whose children are receiving only online instruction and 27% of parents whose children are receiving a combination of in-person and online instruction.

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However, the vast majority of parents in these types of teaching say they are at least somewhat satisfied with the way their children’s school handles teaching.

Concerns about children falling behind in school are especially common among parents of K-12 students who are receiving at least some online instruction this fall. those whose children receive a combination of in-person and online instruction are the most concerned. Seven out of ten parents whose children receive online education – either fully or in combination with in-person learning – say they or another adult in their household provides at least some additional instruction or resources to their children beyond what is provided by the school. This is significantly higher than the percentage of parents whose children only receive personal education (52%).

Among those whose children go to school in person, 45% say they are very satisfied with the steps their children’s school is taking to prevent the spread of the coronavirus, and this is especially true for parents whose children receive only in-person education (52% vs. 39% of those whose children receive a combination of in-person and online instruction). However, parents whose children go to school express some concern about their children being exposed to the coronavirus at school: 62% are at least somewhat concerned, with 20% saying they are

The survey also finds some differences in income. For example, lower-income parents of K-12 students (72%) are more likely than middle-income parents (63%) and upper-income parents (55%) to say they are very or somewhat concerned that their children they stay behind. school as a result of disruptions caused by the pandemic.

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And lower-income parents (72%) are more likely than those in the higher income bracket (58%) to say that they or another adult in their household provides at least some additional guidance or resources to their children beyond what provided by the school. In turn, parents with higher incomes are the most likely to say they have

These are among the key findings of a Pew Research Center survey of 10,332 US adults. conducted October 13-19, 2020, using the Center’s American Trends team.

The survey, which includes 2,561 parents with children under 18 living in the household, also explores broader concerns of parents of children in K-12 and younger schools about the impact of the coronavirus outbreak on their children’s development and well-being.

With the fall semester underway, 46% of parents with elementary, middle, or high school-aged children in their household report that their children only receive online education from their school. 20% say they only receive in-person tutoring, and 23% say their kids get a mix of online and in-person tutoring (4% say it’s different situations for different kids).

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The percentage of parents with children in K-12 education who say their children are homeschooled has increased significantly since the spring: 7% this fall, compared to 3% in April. Lower- and middle-income parents are more likely than higher-income parents to say their children are homeschooled (6% and 9% vs. 2%, respectively). In April, similar percentages of parents at all income levels said this.

Parents of K-12 students who receive only in-person education are more satisfied than those whose children learn online

Among parents of K-12 students who all receive the same type of instruction at school, 35% say they are very satisfied with how their children’s school handles instruction. 44% are somewhat satisfied, while 21% are not very or not at all satisfied. Similar percentages of parents at all income levels say they are at least somewhat satisfied with the way their children’s school is handling instruction this fall.

Parents whose children only receive private tutoring are by far the most satisfied with how their children’s school handled instruction this fall: 54% of these parents say they are very satisfied, compared to 30% of of parents whose children receive only online education, and 27% who say their children receive a combination of in-person and online instruction. However, three-quarters or more in each of the three groups say they are at least somewhat satisfied with the way their children’s school handles teaching.

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Most parents of K-12 students worry about their children falling behind in school due to pandemic-related disruptions

Amid disruptions caused by the coronavirus outbreak, a majority of parents of K-12 students (65%) express at least some concern about their children falling behind in school, with three in 10 saying they are

Interested. Lower-income parents (72%) are more likely than middle-income (63%) and upper-income parents (55%) to say they are worried about their children falling behind in school as a result of the upheavals caused by the pandemic.

Parents whose children receive a combination of in-person and online instruction are the most likely to worry about their children falling behind in school, and those whose children receive only in-person instruction are the least likely to worry. About three-quarters of parents whose children receive blended learning (74%) say they are very or somewhat concerned about their children falling behind, compared to 65% of those whose children receive online-only education and 56% of those whose children receive only in-person instruction.

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Most parents of K-12 students say they or someone else in their household provides additional instruction beyond what schools provide

About two-thirds of parents of K-12 students (66%) say they or another adult in their household provides additional instruction or resources to their children beyond what the school provides. That’s similar to the share he said in April, when K-12 schools in all 50 states were closed because of the pandemic.

Parents whose children receive only online instruction (72%) or a combination of in-person and online instruction (66%) are more likely than those whose children receive only in-person instruction (52%) to say that they or another adult in their household provide at least some additional instruction or resources to their children. Among lower-income parents, 72% say they or another adult in the household provides them with additional guidance or resources, compared to 58% of higher-income parents. 65% of middle-income parents say the same.

Higher-income parents of K-12 students are more likely to say they have hired someone to provide extra education for their children

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While many parents of K-12 students say they or another adult in their household provides additional instruction or resources to their children beyond what is provided by school, a relatively small percentage (9%) say

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